ANIMATION 4TH WEEK

The final week introduced CGI, digital animation with the task of downloading free 3D software to create a room which told the viewer about the occupant, to move around the room and use ‘3D assets’ (ready digitised objects) . . . this didn’t interest me.overlap actionI chose instead to use my own desktop, across the front of which I moved my camera. With an artists’ wooden model, desk lamp and sheaf of stick figure drawings, I created a narrative. I used ‘locked frame’ digital camera progressing to stop-go movement of the 3 chosen objects. blog

 

The timing could be better.

 

The course is now over. I have been happy to use this 4 week Prospectus for the NFTS where I was introduced to Movie Maker, Vimeo, and other animators. I shall enjoy improving and using my new-found animation skills.

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Enjoy my little animation . . .

 

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Animation Third Week

Using what I have learned so far and having bought plasticine, I decided to do a ‘proper job’.

1. made three plasticine figures thinking of character and plot

2. made a ‘set’ – cardboard box, backdrop drawn in charcoal, photographed, edited on photoshop, printed, stuck in cardboard box. Background

3, Practise run – camera lens had too ‘wide’ a view so, bigger set needed next time, plasticine collapsing

4, put figures in fridge to ‘chill’ PLAN – use digitization, stop-go all in real 3D

5. applied LIGHTING, removed figures from fridge, still falling and bending, used wire as armature, made fat feet. This worked . . . just

6. MOVED CAMERA while filming set in DIGITIZATION, switched to STOP-GO for action changing camera POSITION twice.

7. Edited out several frames in Vimeo

8. https://vimeo.com/152797426

 

 

POEMS on the WEB

To begin . . . ‘a killer’ poem, to quote my publisher, which isn’t on the web but printed in ‘Obsessed with Pipework’.

BANANAS

I nick the neck of a Fair Trade banana

strip the skin

peel the shrivel-my-tongue veins

slice it over my morning porridge

drown it in milk

IMG_0796and think of you.

AND ON THE WEB . . . South Bank Poetry Library

http://www.poetrymagazines.org.uk/magazine/record.asp?id=28629

http://www.poetrymagazines.org.uk/magazine/record.asp?id=28632

http://www.poetrymagazines.org.uk/magazine/record.asp?id=28634

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OCTOBER ROSE

Claire Austin: myrrh scent, repeat flowering, late afternoon sun.

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Poets, writers, mythical tales have used the rose as symbol of many things – a single red rose, a white rose, peace, remembrance, love, blood, war, passion. I use Louis Macneice’s poem, ‘SNOW’ to accompany my photographs. I love the way he expands a simple and diverse image into a world of everything.

SNOW

The room was suddenly rich and the great bay window was

Spawning snow and pink roses against it

Soundlessly collateral and incompatible:

World is suddener than we fancy it.

 

World is crazier and more of it than we think,

Incorrigibly plural. I peel and portion

A tangerine and spit the pips and feel

The drunkeness of things being various.

 

And the fire flames with a bubbling sound for world

Is more spiteful and gay than one supposes –

On the tongue on the eyes on the ears in the palms of your hands –

There is more than glass between the snow and the huge roses.

Louis Macneice1907 – 1963, Irish poet and playwright

 

                                                       IN CONTRAST . . .

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William Blake: 1757 – 1827; Painter, Poet, Printmaker.

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spider                                            Picasso: ‘Histoire Naturelle

September again and spiders in house and garden. Conker time too! I have thrown them into corners and crevices in the hall, sitting and dining rooms to keep spiders out. Only having last year’s shrivelled conker remains last month, I jumped the mile when a black, spiky feet, fat bodied, big as a dinner plate house spider, shot across the sitting room floor. James Bond and the shoe . . . that was me without the hammering soundtrack. There was another crouched on the bedroom curtains a few days ago, obliterated with a hastily fetched Radio Times and I now have conkers upstairs in the corners, on and under the windowsill. It may or may not be an old wives’ tale. But I sleep better.

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Webs hang like traps in the garden. unseen unless the sun strikes them, or one spots the black carcass of a fly, suspended, eye-level.

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It’s an unusual autumn, the blossom of a spring-flowering, evergreen clematis is blooming. The scent is heavenly, like frangipangi and honey.

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John Keats: (31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821). ‘To Autumn’, was written on 19 September 1819 after a walk near Winchester.

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To Autumn

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness
Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run;
To bend with apples the moss’d cottage-trees,
And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel shells
With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
For Summer has o’er-brimm’d their clammy cells.
Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reap’d furrow sound asleep,
Drows’d with the fume of poppies, while thy hook
Spares the next swath and all its twined flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
Steady thy laden head across a brook;
Or by a cider-press, with patient look,
Thou watchest the last oozings hours by hours.
Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too,-
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
Among the river sallows, borne aloft
Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft;
And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.
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VIEWS of LONDON

                                  South Bank                                                                         

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                                         Hungerford Bridge

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                                  Liverpool Street

Blog 2                                  Enfield Lock

blog5   Bliss

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The Day After the Day Before

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The day after the day after Winchester Writers’ Festival I spent the first hour walking along the shore. I didn’t think about dead bodies, or forensics. The second hour I sat in the dappled garden with tea and crumpet. I read, ‘The Uninvited’, by Liz Jensen. Just half way through and it is finally getting my attention.

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I carried my camera to the shore and into the garden, and took 109 photos. I also slipped it into my bag before the festival and took not one single snap. I was unable to gather any interest at all despite giving myself a pep talk, ‘you’ll like it once you get there,’ ‘a free lunch’ . . . it didn’t work . . . ‘feedback on your novel,’ aroused some interest.

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A place at the festival was my first prize for the best murder short-story last summer and I had been looking forward to going. I had just finished a 75,000 word detective story and was happy!!  Ahh, there’s the rub.blog7

blog5I had been cluttered with all four one-to-one sessions in one day, not my choice. With ME I knew I would be shattered . . . was shattered by 10.30am. Shattered after I parked the car in ‘disabled,’ a seriously angled narrow bay between two brick walls, a car-length wide.

All three agents gave completely and utterly diverse feedback: ‘excellent pitch’, ‘not long enough’; ‘Great opening’; ‘lose the opening’; ‘really connected to character’; ‘character betrays responsibility to reader’ . . . I could go on. What did I expect?

The peach; ‘An accountant, an organised person, and a good one, does not aspire to murder.’ This comment threw me. Nowhere does this character aspire to, or commit murder.Where’s the sense in that remark?

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Then, I understood, either he hadn’t bothered to read the synopsis properly, or I hadn’t written it well enough . . . I doubt he had read the requested 10,000 words. Then came the ‘how to’ tip – ‘Have a picture of your protagonist’ . . . A’HEM . . . The lecture continued and I switched off, glad when it was over. For this level of feedback, I could have borrowed a book from the library. Soooo glad it was free!

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Apart from that, the novel is; ‘publishable’, has ‘definite commercial viability’, all agreed it was, ‘well written’.

I was too flat and tired to hang about for the final 1-2-1 but left my e mail in order for her to contact me with feedback. Wonder if she’ll bother?

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At lunch I met and had an agreeable conversation with a young man who had completed his first novel, gained a professional critique and was a member of a supportive writing group. After the festival he planned to ‘send off’, to lots of publishers, if the book wasn’t taken up, he would publish digitally. Well planned.

I am sorry to have lost his blog address, (I lose things frequently) and if he reads this, please send it to me via my other blog; www.silverfingerpress.wordpress.com – thank you.

I have ordered a second hand forensics manual from Blackwells, a tip for all sleuth-writers from the hour of master class; ‘Bring out your Dark Side’ that I did manage to get to.

1-2-1 Feedback was personal with an eye on business. I sat next to a young woman while waiting, her novel is about a town of angels on earth taking care of us humans. I metaphorically cast my eyes heavenwards thinking ‘derivative’, while smiling; ‘lovely.’I spoke to her afterwards, the agent will read it when it’s finished. There we go.

I have seen my angel. It appeared between me and a dying woman in case death mistook me for her. The angel was much bigger than the hospital ward and gold flakes, like fish scales caught the light before it went. The woman in the bed opposite died while the angel was there. I’d like to say, ‘while the angel spread its wings,’ but I didn’t see wings.

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